HR

When planning how to address challenges and create an environment for successful remote teams, leaders will focus on best practices that support organization and team dynamics—but also, each individual employee. This toolkit provides considerations for having employees and teams succeed in a remote environment, and how...

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has issued questions and answers (Q&As) on when federal contractors must include Service Contract Act (SCA), Davis- Bacon Act (DBA) or Executive Order (EO) 13706 fringe benefits—or their monetary equivalent—for workers taking leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA).

According to the Q&As, federal contractors whose work is covered by the SCA, the DBA or EO 13706 generally do not have to pay the health and welfare fringe benefit rate that those laws and the executive order would normally require when employees take FFCRA paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave.

Everyone knows that name-calling, teasing and other bullying behavior is unwelcome in the workplace.

But what if the comments are veiled in humor? Jokes about “old farts” or “screen-obsessed millennials” might seem like acceptable office banter to some, but these comments may amount to ageism and could seriously impact an organization—and should be quickly snuffed out when noticed.
This article explains some of the ways offhand comments can affect a workplace and outlines steps employers can take to combat their spread.

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to evolve, one guideline that is likely to last beyond this year is social distancing.

Employers have a responsibility to keep employees healthy and safe, and that duty is informing their return-to-work strategies. For instance, some organizations are keeping employees at home to work remotely for the foreseeable future. Other organizations are reconfiguring office layouts to lower capacity and considering safety measures like temperature checks and staggered shifts. No matter what an organization decides, its initiatives should be true to the company’s mission and values. As employers deliberate on new policies or procedures in response to the pandemic, it’s important to consider how those efforts might impact company culture and vice versa.